Landscapes in Mathematical Sciences

This is our Department Colloquium, with distinguished speakers giving an overview of a topic of general mathematical interest. The talks are aimed at a level to be accessible to all postgraduate students and staff in the department. Advanced undergraduates and members of other departments are also welcome to attend.

Talks last a full hour and, unless otherwise stated, take place in the Wolfson Theatre (4W1.7), beginning at 3:15pm. Tea is available from 30 minutes before the talk in the foyer outside the lecture theatre.

Contact


Next Landscapes Seminar

Date Speaker Title/Abstract
5 October 2018 Philip Maini
Oxford
Does mathematics have anything to do with biology?
In this talk, I will review a number of interdisciplinary collaborations in which I have been involved over the years that have coupled mathematical modelling with experimental studies to try to advance our understanding of processes in biology and medicine. Examples will include somatic evolution in tumours, collective cell movement in epithelial sheets, and pattern formation in slime mould. These are examples where verbal reasoning models are misleading and insufficient, while mathematical models can enhance our intuition.

Autumn 2018

Date Speaker Title/Abstract
5 October 2018 Philip Maini
Oxford
Does mathematics have anything to do with biology?
In this talk, I will review a number of interdisciplinary collaborations in which I have been involved over the years that have coupled mathematical modelling with experimental studies to try to advance our understanding of processes in biology and medicine. Examples will include somatic evolution in tumours, collective cell movement in epithelial sheets, and pattern formation in slime mould. These are examples where verbal reasoning models are misleading and insufficient, while mathematical models can enhance our intuition.
19 October 2018 Nigel Hitchin
Oxford
Integrable systems and algebraic geometry
Completely integrable Hamiltonian systems form an important concept in many areas of mathematics and include classical examples like the equations for a spinning top or the geodesics on an ellipsoid. A huge range of examples comes from considering the algebraic geometry of moduli spaces of Higgs bundles on a Riemann surface. The talk will focus on the geometry of the singular locus for these systems and how certain constructions in algebraic geometry help to understand the structure of this locus.

A list of talks in recent past years can be found here.