Year 2 Research Skills Homepage (HL20107)

Text Box: “Statistics is like a lamppost.  Used more wisely for guidance than for support” 
[click here]
Text Box: Notice Board

•	Please check this notice board occasionally as any important reminders or changes to the planned schedule of this unit will be shown here. 



Text Box: Unit Leader: Dr James Betts
Department for Health
University of Bath
Bath
BA2 7AY
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)1225 383 448
Email: J.Betts@bath.ac.uk

                                       

 

 

 

Late submission of coursework:

If any piece of work is submitted after the submission date it will be assessed at a maximum of 40% unless an extension was granted beforehand by the Director of Studies due to mitigating circumstances.

 

 

Assessment Criteria: General

 

Assessment for each scenario will be weighted according to the following criteria:

 

Evaluation & Analysis                   30 %

Reading & Research                      20 %

Communication & Presentation       20 %

Knowledge & Understanding        30 %

                                                       100 %

 

Threshold definitions:

 

First Class:>70 %

 

Evaluation:              the focus of the question/problem/task is understood; key issues are understood and significant related issues are identified; theory and concepts are deployed in a manner which is critically self-aware; ability to deploy competing/alternative analyses/ perspectives/solutions is apparent.

 

Reading:                 A wide variety of sources have been cited with evidence of critical appraisal of each and a clear interpretation of the global area of study.

 

Communication:      the structure is clear; the form of communication/medium selected is appropriate; technical and/or conceptual language or skill sets are used with confidence.

 

Knowledge:             subject/discipline-specific knowledge is used to illuminate the task and to make links with related issues/tasks i.e. a capability of extending particular analysis to other issues/tasks; where appropriate discipline/paradigm boundaries are recognised and critical awareness demonstrated.

 

 

Upper Second Class:>60 %

 

Evaluation:              focus of the question/problem/task is understood and one or two related issues identified; analytical techniques/methods are theoretically informed; some awareness of competing alternative analyses/perspectives/solutions is apparent.

 

Reading:                 A wide variety of sources have been cited and then effectively organised to lead into the relevant area of study.

 

Communication:      structure is clear; the form of communication/medium selected is appropriate to the task; overall the argument is concise and coherently developed; an appropriate technical and/or conceptual language is used with reasonable confidence.

 

Knowledge:             subject/discipline specific knowledge is used to illuminate the task.

 

Lower Second Class:>55 %

 

Evaluation:              the focus of the question/problem/task is understood; key issues identified; one of two related issues identified; analytical techniques/concepts/theories are applied appropriately.

 

Reading:                 There is some evidence of information retrieval and an attempt to interpret the available evidence.

 

Communication:      the structure is appropriate, elements of development/progress are evident; appropriate language and concepts are used.

Knowledge:             subject/discipline specific knowledge is used to illuminate the task.

 

 

Lower Second Class:>50 %

 

Evaluation:              the focus of the question/problem/task is understood; key issues identified.

 

Reading:                 The key relevant literature is cited and applied to the research question.

 

Communication:      the structure is broadly appropriate; elements of development/ progression and basic concepts are correctly used.

 

Knowledge:             there is evidence that subject specific knowledge related to the core issues or task has been selected.

 

Third Class: >40 %

 

Evaluation:              the focus of the question/problem/task is understood and one or two issues identified.

 

Reading:                 A broad introduction to the research area is provided.

 

Communication:      one or two elements of an appropriate structure are present.

 

Knowledge:             there is evidence of subject/discipline specific knowledge.